OKSP: a novel deep learning automatic event detection pipeline for seismic monitoring in Costa Rica

Small magnitude earthquakes are the most abundant but the most difficult to locate robustly and well due to their low amplitudes and high frequencies usually obscured by heterogeneous noise sources. They highlight crucial information about the stress state and the spatio-temporal behavior of fault s...

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Main Authors: Van der Laat, Leonardo, Baldares, Ronald, Chaves, Esteban, Meneses, Esteban
Format: Otro
Language: Inglés
Published: Instituto de Ingenieros Eléctricos y Electrónicos (IEEE) 2024
Subjects:
Online Access: http://hdl.handle.net/11056/27678
https://doi.org/10.48550/arXiv.2109.02723
Summary: Small magnitude earthquakes are the most abundant but the most difficult to locate robustly and well due to their low amplitudes and high frequencies usually obscured by heterogeneous noise sources. They highlight crucial information about the stress state and the spatio-temporal behavior of fault systems during the earthquake cycle, therefore, its full characterization is then crucial for improving earthquake hazard assessment. Modern deep learning algorithms along with the increasing computational power and efficiency are exploiting the continuously growing seismological databases, worldwide, allowing scientists to improve the completeness for earthquake catalogs, systematically detecting and locating smaller magnitude earthquakes and reducing the errors introduced mainly by human intervention through traditional approaches in seismological observatories. In this work, we introduce OKSP, a novel deep learning automatic earthquake detection pipeline for seismic monitoring in Costa Rica. Using Kabre supercomputer from the Costa Rica High Technology Center, we applied OKSP to the day before and the first 5 days following the Puerto Armuelles, M6.5, earthquake that occurred on 26 June, 2019, along the Costa Rica-Panama border and found 1100 more earthquakes previously unidentified by the Volcanological and Seismological Observatory of Costa Rica. From these events, a total of 23 earthquakes with magnitudes below 1.0 occurred a day to hours prior to the mainshock, shedding light about the rupture initiation and earthquake interaction leading to the occurrence of this productive seismic sequence. Our observations show that for the study period, the model was 100% exhaustive and 82% precise, resulting in an F1 score of 0.90. This effort represents the very first attempt for automatically detecting earthquakes in Costa Rica using deep learning methods and demonstrates that, in the near future, earthquake monitoring routines will be carried out entirely by AI algorithms.