Molecular Characterization of Two Major Dengue Outbreaks in Costa Rica

Dengue virus (DENV) (Flavivirus, Flaviviridae) is a reemerging arthropod-borne virus with a worldwide circulation, transmitted mainly by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. Since the first detection of its main transmitting vector in 1992 and the invasion of DENV-1 in 1993, Costa Rica h...

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Autores Principales: Soto Garita, Claudio, Somogyi Pérez, Teresa, Vicente Santos, Amanda, Corrales Aguilar, Eugenia
Formato: Artículo
Idioma: Inglés
Publicado: 2017
Materias:
Acceso en línea: http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0835
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/30373
https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0835
Sumario: Dengue virus (DENV) (Flavivirus, Flaviviridae) is a reemerging arthropod-borne virus with a worldwide circulation, transmitted mainly by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. Since the first detection of its main transmitting vector in 1992 and the invasion of DENV-1 in 1993, Costa Rica has faced dengue outbreaks yearly. In 2007 and 2013, Costa Rica experienced two of the largest outbreaks in terms of total and severe cases. To provide genetic information about the etiologic agents producing these outbreaks, we conducted phylogenetic analysis of viruses isolated from human samples. A total of 23 DENV-1 and DENV-2 sequences were characterized. These analyses signaled that DENV-1 genotype V and DENV-2 American/Asian genotype were circulating in those outbreaks. Our results suggest that the 2007 and 2013 outbreak viral strains of DENV-1 and DENV-2 originated from nearby countries and underwent in situ microevolution.