Student-Teachers’ Perception of Feedback Sessions

In the implementation of an ESP course, post-graduate students receive their supervisors’ opinions in post-observation sessions which tend to be considered troublesome and a “necessary evil.” This study provided tips to 4 participants to improve their experience and thus change their perceptions of...

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Main Author: González Ramírez, Ana Carolina
Format: Artículo
Language: Inglés
Published: Escuela de Lenguas Modernas, Universidad de Costa Rica 2013
Subjects:
Online Access: http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/rlm/article/view/12668
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/23524
Summary: In the implementation of an ESP course, post-graduate students receive their supervisors’ opinions in post-observation sessions which tend to be considered troublesome and a “necessary evil.” This study provided tips to 4 participants to improve their experience and thus change their perceptions of feedback sessions into a more enriching and positive experience because student-teachers who hold this view are more effective both as learners and teachers-in-training. Three data-collection instruments were used to evaluate possible changes in their perceptions. In the questionnaire, trainees mentioned emotions such as nervousness, mild interest, and frustration before, during, and after the feedback sessions. Observations and interviews indicated that the tips moderately achieved their goal and enhanced student-teachers’ motivation, self-awareness, and open-mindedness toward the sessions and the feedback received. Trainees described these sessions as an opportunity for reflection, adjustment, and improvement. Possible negative effects of power-differential (Anderson, 2007) were also observed in the participants. Their emotions, physical condition, experience, and expectations are discussed as possible reasons underlying the negative concept that feedback sessions usually hold. Limitations of this study included availability of participants and schedule of supervisions.