Application of ‘shallow-water’ numerical models for hazard assessment of volcanic flows: the TITAN2D model

This paper introduces Titan2D, a depth averaged model of an incompressible Coulomb continuum for “shallow water” granular flows. Titan2D has been used successfully at many volcanoes to predict inundation by block-and-ash flows and debris avalanches. It can be run as a stand-alone program or through...

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Autores Principales: Charbonnier, S J., Palma, J L., Ogburn, S
Formato: Artículo
Idioma: Español
Publicado: Universidad de Costa Rica 2015
Materias:
Acceso en línea: http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/geologica/article/view/19021
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/22680
Sumario: This paper introduces Titan2D, a depth averaged model of an incompressible Coulomb continuum for “shallow water” granular flows. Titan2D has been used successfully at many volcanoes to predict inundation by block-and-ash flows and debris avalanches. It can be run as a stand-alone program or through Vhub, a cyber-infrastructure platform. Practical considerations of choosing appropriate user inputs and the basics of running the model are discussed herein. Both synthetic and natural terrain examples are presented, including simulations of a block-and-ash flow generated from the gravitational collapse of a synthetic dome at Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica). These results suggest that the model should be limited to simulate cases of dense volcanic granular flows, like those produced by gravity-driven dome collapse events, but cannot be used to simulate dilute pyroclastic density currents. Finally, estimation of the Titan2D resistance terms by using empirical relationships provides a good method for reducing model input uncertainties