Are some life-history strategies more vulnerable to the genetic consequences of habitat fragmentation? A case study using South Australian Caladenia R. Br. (Orchidaceae) species

Habitat fragmentation, through land clearing, has been attributed in the demise of many species of plants and animals throughout the world (Kinzig and Harte 2000). Not surprisingly, much research effort has been devoted toward understanding the dynamics of populations subject to fragmentation. 

Autores Principales: Farrington, Lachlan, Facelli, José, Donnellan, Stephen, Austin, Andy
Formato: Artículo
Idioma: Español
Publicado: Universidad de Costa Rica 2015
Materias:
Acceso en línea: http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/lankesteriana/article/view/19519
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/21005
Sumario: Habitat fragmentation, through land clearing, has been attributed in the demise of many species of plants and animals throughout the world (Kinzig and Harte 2000). Not surprisingly, much research effort has been devoted toward understanding the dynamics of populations subject to fragmentation.