“Chispismo” y comunismo: crónica de una disidencia en la izquierda argentina de los años ‘20

The appearance of a newspaper like La Chispa, in February 1926, can be read as an expression of the first crisis in the history of the still young Argentinean Communist Party (CPA). A growing tension caused by tactical and strategic disagreements, and also about how to conceive a political action an...

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Main Author: Kersffeld, Daniel
Format: Artículo
Language: Español
Published: UCR 2013
Subjects:
Online Access: http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/estudios/article/view/8840
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/19900
Summary: The appearance of a newspaper like La Chispa, in February 1926, can be read as an expression of the first crisis in the history of the still young Argentinean Communist Party (CPA). A growing tension caused by tactical and strategic disagreements, and also about how to conceive a political action and the construction of a power oriented into a revolution sense, were elements that were present from the very origins of Argentinean communism (even when it has not yet adopted this name and instead it called itself International Socialist Party), that will finally burst in the mid-'20s. Without wishing to be isolated from the growing revolutionary network that was weaving all over the world having as a center Moscow, La Chispa, and through it, the Communist Workers Party, tried to build a different and alternative communist movement to that other that incarnated the original version around the leadership of José Fernando Penelon, surrounded by two leaders in rapid ascent: Victorio Codovilla y Rodolfo Ghioldi.