Preoperative skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection

The results of secondary research that refers to preoperative skin preparation with antiseptic chlorhexidine 2% are presented. Surgical Site Infections are one of the most common complications in surgical procedures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the user and are the thir...

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Autor Principal: Solano Castro, Evelyn
Formato: Artículo
Idioma: Español
Publicado: Universidad de Costa Rica 2014
Acceso en línea: http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/enfermeria/article/view/13879
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/19521
Sumario: The results of secondary research that refers to preoperative skin preparation with antiseptic chlorhexidine 2% are presented. Surgical Site Infections are one of the most common complications in surgical procedures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the user and are the third -associated infection more frequent in the health care . Steps of clinical practice based on evidence were applied, considering in the first instance a question in PICO format, then a search for information in databases recommended in the Course of Clinical Nursing Practice Evidence-Based, taught by the program for Collaborative Research in Evidence-Based Nursing of Costa Rica ( CIEBE -CR ). The PubMed database and Cochrane LIBRARY was consulted, National Center for Biotechnology Information ( NCBI), Google Scholar, CINAHL (cummulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature). SCIELO (Scientific Electronic Library on line www.Scielo.org . 22 documents were recovered, but only three were selected because had methodological rigor. For the critical analysis Critical Reading Sheets 2.0 ( FLC) software was used. Was concluded that 2% chlorhexidine, is the best choice for preoperative skin preparation antiseptic, however, it is necessary to conduct further studies in order to determine which is the correct way in strength, frequency, technical and adverse effects in the pediatric population.