Relaciones entre la representación antropomorfa-zoomorfa de piezas prehispánicas de la Región Central de Costa Rica y dos cartas de Juan Vázquez de Coronado del siglo XVI

The following study analyzes two letters written in 1563 by the Spanish conqueror and peace-maker Juan Vasquez de Coronado in light of two general aspects: the first, a map taken from the book Garcimuñoz la ciudad que nunca murió by Carlos Molina Montes de Oca (1993) and a comparison with the Google...

Descripción completa

Autor Principal: Vargas Benavides, Henry O.
Formato: Artículo
Idioma: Español
Publicado: 2015
Materias:
Acceso en línea: http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/filyling/article/view/13850
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/14519
Sumario: The following study analyzes two letters written in 1563 by the Spanish conqueror and peace-maker Juan Vasquez de Coronado in light of two general aspects: the first, a map taken from the book Garcimuñoz la ciudad que nunca murió by Carlos Molina Montes de Oca (1993) and a comparison with the Google Maps virtual platform. Here, the route followed by the conqueror with his troop of Spaniards and indigenous people from Garcimuñoz to Quepos and to the region of Coctos is examined. The second aspect is a series of four anthropomorphic figures carved in stone and a gold piece from the subregion of Diquis. All of them belong to the collection of the National Museum of Costa Rica. These figures contrast with the characteristics of those from settlements such as Quepos (the chieftainship of Corrohore) and the settlement of the Coctos Warriors described in both letters.