Protestantism and ethnic identity moravian missionaries on the Nicaraguan Atlantic coast in the 19th Century

When it comes to explaining the cultural differences which separate the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua from the Pacific part of the country, one of the distinguishing aspects always pointed out is the difference in religion: The overwhelming majority of the population in Western Nicaragua is Catholic,...

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Autor Principal: von Oertzen, Eleonore
Formato: Artículo
Idioma: Español
Publicado: 2015
Acceso en línea: http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/antropologia/article/view/10760
http://hdl.handle.net/10669/13226
Sumario: When it comes to explaining the cultural differences which separate the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua from the Pacific part of the country, one of the distinguishing aspects always pointed out is the difference in religion: The overwhelming majority of the population in Western Nicaragua is Catholic, whereas on the Atlantic Coast the major part of the inhabitants belongs to some Protestant church, and the Miskito Indians in their vast majority are Moravians1. Although the Atlantic Coast takes up almost half of the national territory, it is home to only one tenth of the country’s population. Great part of its inhabitants are spanish speaking mestizos of rather recent migration, besides Native Americans and approximately 25000 Afroamericans, called creoles. Among the native peoples, the Miskito are by far the most numerous (app. 67 000), compared to 5000 Sumu and 650 Rama Indians.